Academics

Inside the Classroom: Our Brand Comparison Project

Toward the end of the fall semester, we worked on one of my favorite projects in “Marketing & Quantitative Analysis,” taught by Professor Richard Netemeyer, whose enthusiasm and boisterous humor are guaranteed to wake you up if you have class with him at 8 a.m. For our project this year, students worked in teams, performing a brand comparison of two competing brands using both quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis.

M.S. in Commerce students work on numerous group projects across classes. Toward the end of the fall semester, we worked on one of my favorite projects in “Marketing & Quantitative Analysis,” taught by Professor Richard Netemeyer, whose enthusiasm and boisterous humor are guaranteed to wake you up if you have class with him at 8 a.m.

For our project this year, students worked in teams, performing a brand comparison of two competing brands using both quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. Brand comparisons included:

• Starbucks vs. Dunkin’
• Domino’s vs. Papa John’s
• Bose Corporation vs. Beats Electronics
• HBO vs. Netflix
• Apple Music vs. Spotify
• Puma vs. Adidas

My group selected Domino’s vs. Papa John’s, so naturally, we ordered a pizza from each during every group meeting, you know, for research.

The brand comparison project was divided into three components: a qualitative SWOT analysis industry research paper, quantitative analysis using methods learned in class, and a group presentation of findings. We answered several questions, including “How will the less dominant brand compete and gain market share relative to the dominant brand, given current product line, brand attributes, and current environmental trends and/or factors?” and “What brand extension or new brand attribute would you recommend for the less dominant brand to better compete against the dominant brand?”

students after presenting their project

Michael (far left) with his teammates after their final presentation.

For those of you who haven’t conducted any quantitative analysis, don’t worry! Professor Netemeyer teaches all about how to conduct an analysis and why it’s important for it to be done accurately. Whether you’re interested in the Marketing & Management, Finance, or Business Analytics Track, the skills you will acquire from this class will benefit you in the long run in any industry you enter. If you choose to pursue the Business Analytics Track, like myself, you will build on these analytical skills gained in the spring semester in “Advanced Quantitative Analysis,” also taught by Professor Netemeyer.

By this point in the semester, presenting became second nature to me and my team, and knowing how to present is an essential skill I know I’ll use in the workforce. As with every other course you will take, use this project as a chance to broaden your skill set. If you love marketing, embrace your passion, and if you don’t, step out of your comfort zone.
Final pro tip: The M.S. in Commerce Program is geared toward building a well-rounded business acumen for all of its students, so take advantage of every learning opportunity.

I hope to see you all on Grounds! You can learn more at an upcoming event.

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